Apratim Saha

Photography

 

Thursday, 06 July 2017 06:05

TAMRON SP 15-30MM F/2.8 Di VC REVIEW

Written by

I’m a people photographer and one of my favourite focal length is 16-35. You may be surprised that how this focal length could be a favourite for a people photographer. Well, firstly I don’t shoot from a long distance. I prefer to go very close to my subjects, I talk with them make them comfortable with the camera and shoot. Secondly and most importantly you have a lot of other advantages with this focal length like you can create a human frame between the frame and you can include much more subjects in your frame. You can get very good environmental portraits also with this one.

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/3.5 1/125sec ISO: 160 Hand Held

When I have been offered to use TAMRON’s SP 15-30mm f/2.8 Di VC USD, the world’s first f/2.8 image stabilization, during my last Workshop at Kathmandu, my primary goal was to find out how good the lens is, particularly when compared to that lens which I have been relying on heavily for years.

With its impressive optical performance and the Ultrasonic Silent Drive motor (USD), the lens focuses both silently and quickly, similar to other high-quality professional lenses like the Tamron SP 24-70mm f/2.8 VC. The built-in image stabilization, which Tamron markets as “Vibration Compensation” (VC), provides up to 4 stops of compensation for hand-held shooting. I hardly use tripods so it was a great additional advantage for me also especially during low light conditions. VC is definitely the highlight of the Tamron’s 15-30mm f/2.8 because it is the world’s first ultra-wide angle zooms to offer it. Tamron has been consistent in its use of vibration compensation in high-quality lenses – the lens follows the path of the Tamron SP 24-70mm f/2.8 VC, which also was world’s first 24-70mm lens to offer image stabilization. While both Canon and Nikon have been excluding image stabilization from their professional-grade wide-angle and standard lenses, Tamron has been making it clear that image stabilization should be included in every high-end lens, no matter what the focal length is. And that’s where I am in total agreed with Tamron – despite the claims by some photographers that image stabilization is not needed on wide angle lenses, based on my experience, image stabilization is very effective and useful for every type of lens.

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/5.6 1/1250sec ISO: 3200 Hand Held

When it comes to optical design, the Tamron SP 15-30mm f/2.8 VC is just great with a total of 18 lens elements in 13 groups. 3 of which are of low-dispersion type, 1 moulded - aspherical glass and 2 expanded glass moulded aspherical elements. On top of this, Tamron threw everything it had in its arsenal at the 15-30mm, adding fluorine coating to the front element to repel water and dirt, weather sealing and special eBAND coating to reduce internal reflections and thus effectively minimise ghosting and flare.

As I have already mentioned, the Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8 VC is a beast of a lens, being both larger and heavier than the Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G, which is already the heaviest Nikon ultra-wide angle zoom lens available. Though weight is 1,100 grams, still on higher-end full-frame camera bodies, the lens balances better and feels much steadier especially with body grip along with the well-positioned zoom ring on the lens allowed me to balance it quite well with proper support and comfort of both hands and feels very solid in hands.

As the front element is huge and round, Tamron designed a built-in petal-shaped hood for it, which also feels quite solid. When zooming in and out, the lens does not change in length, although the front element will move in and out together with a secondary plastic hood that matches the shape of the primary hood.

As for the zoom ring, it is very smooth and I didn’t find it getting any stiffer which is a sign of good quality. The same goes for the focus ring, which also feels quite nice when rotating it. Similar to Nikon and Canon lenses, when you get too close focus or infinity marks, the focus ring will continue to rotate, giving very slightly resistance. To protect the front element, Tamron supplied the lens with a push-on front cap also.

As expected from a high-quality lens, the mount is made from durable metal and similar to all recently top class lenses, the Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8 also features a rubber gasket on the lens mount to minimize the risk of attracting dust and other debris into the camera chamber. The Vibration Compensation (VC) switch, along with the AF/MF switch are both located on the side of the lens. The lens comes with a button to turned VC on and off. These switches are easy to move and use.

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/6.3 1/100sec ISO: 100 Hand Held

When it comes to sharpness and contrast, very few lenses can truly compete with the Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G, which in that sense is a truly remarkable lens. In fact, the 14-24mm f/2.8G is known to be sharper than most ultra-wide angle prime lenses – it is that good. However, with the introduction of high-resolution cameras like the D800, D800E and D810, the Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G started to show some of its weaknesses, particularly when it comes to focus shift. When I first looked at Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8 VC’s Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) Chart, I knew that the lens would not disappoint optically. As I had expected, the lens performed admirably well and I did not see any issues with focus shift.

I saw that the lens is very strong at its widest focal length, with remarkable centre sharpness at f/2.8, which almost does not change as you stop down. Such impressive performance is quite rare to see in lenses. The mid-frame and the corners are a bit weak though, which is expected – one would have to stop down to get those sharper. The lens produces very impressive sharpness in the centre frame. The lens again performs the best overall at f/5.6, with a very good balance of centre to corner performance.

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/2.8 1/100sec ISO: 250 Hand Held

As for contrast and colours, I found them to be quite similar to what my Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G produces, which is superb. With such a complex design and so many aspherical and low dispersion elements, it had better be!

The day I converted myself into digital I never shot Jpeg. I always shoot in RAW. I process my images on my own. I was really very curious also that how good this lens is in terms of Vignetting, Chromatic Aberrations, Ghosting and Flare as I had to correct these things during my post productions.

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/5.6 1/500sec ISO: 1250 Hand Held

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/2.8 1/2sec ISO: 500 

However, I must say that this lens has done very good job controlling all these factors. Thanks to Tamron’s special eBAND and BBAR coating technologies, the 15-30mm f/2.8 VC performs admirably well when shooting against very bright sources of light. I have a number of images with the Sun in the frame during the shoot, and as I can see, there are little to no signs of ghosting and flare in images. In fact, based on what I have seen so far, I would rank the Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8 among one of the best lenses I have tested so far in terms of handling of ghosting and flare.

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/2.8 1/125sec ISO: 5000 Hand Held

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/2.8 1/400sec ISO: 160 Hand Held

Tamron deserves a lot of admirations for its SP 15-30mm f/2.8 VC lens – it’s truly a remarkable lens if you see its features and overall performance.

The added benefit of image stabilization is huge – as I have mentioned earlier in this review also, that image stabilization is immensely helpful for photography, even on ultra-wide angle lenses such as this one. And videographers will be even happier with the Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8, because it will make their videos look smoother when shooting hand-held.

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/5.6 1/640sec ISO: 3200 Hand Held

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/2.8 1/60sec ISO: 2500 Hand Held

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/10 1/5sec ISO: 100 Hand Held

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/2.8 1/125sec ISO: 5000 Hand Held

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/2.8 1/640sec ISO: 160 Hand Held

Focal length: 15mm Exposure: F/5 1/640sec ISO: 320 Hand Held

Based on all this, the Tamron SP 15-30mm f/2.8 VC is a lens which falls into my “highly recommended” list of DSLR lenses for the photographers who are into the field of shooting landscapes, wedding, people photography, architecture or environmental portraits. If you are looking for a professional-grade ultra-wide angle zoom lens without spending a lot of money, look no further – the Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8 VC is your lens.

All the images have been shot with TAMRON SP 15-30MM F/2.8 Di VC 

 Published by Tamron India also on their site. Click to view on Tamron site. 

Friday, 25 July 2014 12:21

Maha Kumbh Mela

Written by

Kumbh Mela, the largest spiritual gathering of mankind on the Earth, is held every 12 years on the banks of the ‘Sangam’- the confluence of the holy rivers Ganga, Yamuna and the mythical Saraswati. Millions of devotees take a holy dip in the sacred water during the mela. Maha Kumbha Mela held only at Prayag, once in every 144 years.

It is believed that at the historic moment of the Maha Kumbh Mela, the river turns itself into sanctity spots filled with ‘Amrita’ (Panacia or elixir of immortality). The pilgrims get once in a lifetime chance to bathe in the spirit of holiness, auspiciousness and salvation.

As mythology tells us, when Gods (Devtas) and Demons (Asura) used to reside on Earth, Gods were under the influence of a curse that gave birth of fear in them eventually making them weak. Brahma (the Creator) advised them to churn the milky ocean to obtain the elixir of immortality (Amrita). And Kumbh was the spot chosen to store the nectar of immortality recovered from Samudramanthan.

For 12 heavenly days and 12 heavenly nights, equivalent to 12 Earthly years, Gods were chased by Demons for the possession of Amrita. During the chase for the Amrita, few drops of this elixir out of its ‘Kumbha’ (Pot) fell on four places now known as Allahabad, Haridwar, Ujjain and Nasik. The whole Kumbha mela (carnival) and its cycle is a remembrance of that Mythological story. The mela takes place in all these four places. Out of these the one celebrated at the Holy Sangam in Allahabad is the largest and believed to be the holiest one. Thus the Kumbh Mela became one of the main festivals of Hindus as well as the largest spiritual gathering of mankind on Earth.

Enjoy the spirit of Maha Kumbha Mela here….

YAGGYAN (Worship of fire)

YAGGYAN (Worship of fire)

The Reader

The Reader

You don’t require being alone to concentrate.

SONDHA AROTI

SONDHA AROTI (Evening Puja) on the Ganges at Allahabad.

KUMBH MEMORIES

KUMBH MEMORIES

NAGA

NAGA

SONDHI PUJA

SONDHI PUJA (Evening Puja)

CARRYING AWAY

CARRYING AWAY

It was estimated that this year more than twenty six thousand people has been lost, thousands has been injured and in a tragic accident more than hundred was stampede.

TILAK

TILAK

PROUD TO HAVE A GREAT MUSTACHE

PROUD TO HAVE A GREAT MUSTACHE

JAI HO

JAI HO

NAGA

NAGA

JATRA

JATRA (MUSICAL FOLK THEATRE)

Jatra (Musical Folk Theatre)There are lot of different kind of amusement activity in Kumbh Mela. One of the most popular among them is Jatra (Musical Folk Theatre) based on ancient mythological epic stories.

A MUNDAN CEREMONY AT KUMBH MELA

A MUNDAN CEREMONY AT KUMBH MELA

India is country of rituals, customs & traditions. The Shudhikaran (arrangement of the hair tuft) or the Mundan, is the eighth of the sixteen Hindu ceremony, in which a child receives his or her first haircut. According to this ceremony it should take place at the end of first year or before the expiry of the third year, but the later authorities extend the age to the seventh year. It is believed that the hair from birth is associated with undesirable characters from previous lives which have to be removed by shaving off the hair. Thus at the time of the Mundan, the child is freshly shaven to signify freedom from the past and moving into the future.

ON THE SHOULDER

ON THE SHOULDER

YOUNG SHIVA

YOUNG SHIVA

UNDER THE SKY

UNDER THE SKY

NAGA

NAGA

SONDHI PUJA

SONDHI PUJA (Evening Puja)

HOLY BATH

HOLY BATH

DEVINE CHANT

DEVINE CHANT

UNDER THE SKY

UNDER THE SKY

LET THERE BE BLESS

LET THERE BE BLESS

PREPARING THE DINNER

PREPARING THE DINNER

DRYING CLOTHES

DRYING CLOTHES

SURPRISED

SURPRISED

THAT WAY

THAT WAY

AFTER THE HOLY BATH

AFTER THE HOLY BATH

HOLY BATH

HOLY BATH

THE ANGRY NAGA

THE ANGRY NAGA

PUJA

PUJA

NAGA

NAGA

KEEP DISCIPLINE

KEEP DISCIPLINE

VIOLATING DISCIPLINE

VIOLATING DISCIPLINE

NAGA

NAGA

AROTI

AROTI

EVENING PUJA

EVENING PUJA

RETURNING HOME

RETURNING HOME

Maha Kumbh Mela

 

Monday, 01 April 2013 12:50

Curse of the modern technology

Written by

Once upon a time families created the finest sharies on their handloom that time has gone, modern factories took over this precious work and left only the weaving of towels to insure their income at 10 RPS a piece…

The saying ‘curse of the modern technology’ is so true for the whole villagers of Rajgram in Bankura district of West Bengal. Rajgram is a small village of nearly forty families of weavers. Few years ago I had to go to Bankura for one day for my work. Next day I spend sometimes in the village while waiting for my train. I was aware about the present situation of Rajgram and unable to resist myself to go there.

There was a time when these people were happily living with their weaving profession. Earlier they used to weave Sharis and towels. Now they are only preparing towels. Even they cannot purchase the thread for themselves also. They have to take the thread form the creditor. For a pair of a towel they earn only twenty rupees. Normally it takes a whole day to finish a pair of a towels ! Really they are facing the survival problem. Now a day’s the females and the old men in the family are only sewing and the younger men are trying to get involved in other profession like rickshaw pulling.

Discovering life in the village of Rajgram….


Whose there...?

Curse of Modern Technology

Curse of Modern Technology

Power Cut

Curse of Modern Technology

Another big problem for the people of Rajgram is power cut.

Spinning

Curse of Modern Technology

An old woman spinning

Curse of Modern Technology

Curse of Modern Technology

Curse of Modern Technology

Curse of Modern Technology

A house wife spinning her handloom in front of her small room.

Curse of Modern Technology

Shunil was one of the man who has changed his profession from weaving to rickshaw pulling. He was my rickshaw puller at Rajgram.

Curse of Modern Technology

Curse of Modern Technology

Shaving

Curse of Modern Technology

Life goes on.

 

Saturday, 22 December 2012 13:09

Varanasi

Written by

Mark Twain truly said that “Varanasi is older than history, older than tradition, older even than legend, and looks twice as old as all of them put together”.

Varanasi is also commonly known as Benares or Benaras  and Kashi, a city on the banks of the River Ganges in Uttar Pradesh.  According to legend, the city was founded by the Hindu deity Lord Shiva, several thousand years ago which makes it one of the most important pilgrimage destinations in the country. It is regarded as a holy city by Hindus, Buddhists and Jains. It is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world and the oldest in India.

Enjoy the spirit of Varanasi here….

Varanasi

Om !

Varanasi

Morning puja on Ganges.

In memory of the forefathers

Varanasi

He came all the way from Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal, to Varasnasi to bring homage to his deceased ancestors, like so many Hindu from all over India, believing that after death, the soul given to the Goddess Ganga, remains in the river of life and death.

Sun Rise

Varanasi

Sun rise on Ganges.

Body Building

Varanasi

Early morning body building at Varanasi.

Puja

Varanasi

Puja before Body Building .

Body Building

Varanasi

Early morning body building at Varanasi.

Body Building

Varanasi

Early morning body building on the Ganges.

Pranayam

Varanasi

Early morning pranayam on the Ganges.

Yoga

Varanasi

Sit - Up

Varanasi

Early morning body building on the Ganges.

Priest

Varanasi

Priest

Varanasi

A priest at Varanasi.

Sadhu

Varanasi

A Sadhu at Varanasi.

Handful of blessing

Varanasi

Pradeep Kumar Dwivedi, the priest of the Shitala Mandir at Dasaswamedh Ghat, Varanasi is one of the  few survivors of a tragic bus accident on 3rd June 1996 morning where more than fifty people were killed. Four people are still in coma. In that accident he lost one of his hands. As the time passes by he realized that he was being neglected by his family as he became physically challenged due to that tragic occurrence. One day he told his father that he’ll earn himself and he came to Varanasi. When he came to Varanasi he fell in love with the ancient city.

Mentor

Varanasi

Ganga Darshan

Varanasi

Boating on the Ganges.

Ganga Darshan

Varanasi

Ghats

Varanasi

Ghats of Varanasi.

Fortune Teller

Varanasi

A fortune teller on the Ganges at Varanasi.

Sadhu

Varanasi

A priest from Varanasi.

Waiting

 Waiting

An old woman at Varanasi.

Puja

Varanasi

Puja on the Shitala Mandir.

Puja

Varanasi

Puja on the bank of Ganges.

Burning Ghat

Varanasi

Burning Ghat on the Ganges at Varanasi.

Burning Memories

Varanasi

 Few days ago early in the morning one mobile call from Varanasi really shocked me for some time. Only four words “Sir Kiran mama chale gaye” (Kiran uncle is no more). Though I was getting ready for my office but couldn’t control myself and sat on the couch for an hour. He was only 65 ! Kiran Chowdhury, the famous Doma (A Hindu caste whose duty is to burn the dead and look after the crematorium) of Varanasi is no more ! Though he’ll not burn bodies anymore but there’ll be burning all the time. From now bodies will be burnt without his touch as he burnt to ashes. During my last visit to Varanasi we had a long discussion regarding Hinduism and Karma. That day once again I realised that wisdom doesn’t come from the books always.

Burning Ghat

 Varanasi

Burning Ghat on the Ganges at Varanasi.

Navaratri

Varanasi

A family celebrating Sharada Navaratri at Varanasi.

Evening Puja

Varanasi

Evening Puja on the Ganges at Varanasi.

Durga Bisarjan

 Varanasi

DURGA BISARJAN on the Ganges at Varanasi.

Puja

Varanasi

Evening Puja on Doshomi at Varanasi.

Dura Bisarjan

 Varanasi

DURGA BISARJAN on the Ganges at Varanasi.

Sondha Aroti

Varanasi

Sondha Aroti (Evening Puja) on the Ganges at Varanasi.

Sondha Aroti

Varanasi

Sondha Aroti (Evening Puja) on the Ganges at Varanasi.

Varanasi

A panoramic view of the Varanasi ghats.

Thursday, 28 April 2011 15:31

Making of a devi

Written by

Making of a Devi is the story of the potters who have been devoted their life by making the Hindu goddess.

MAKING OF A DEVI

Making of a devi

Radhe Das is a sixty five years man has started making goddess at the age of seven. He has learned the art from his uncle. Radhe is the only earning member of his family. He is so poor that he cannot hire an extra person to help him. So he works alone in his workshop at Kumartuli.

LIVING STATUE OF A SCULPTOR

Making of a devi

CHOKH DAN

Making of a devi

Creating the eye of a Devi is the most critical and challenging thing. In Hindu mythology it has a name called “Chokh Dan” (Eye Creation).  Normally in the night of Mahalaya, before seven days of Puja all potters used to complete this “Chokh Dan” procedure.

ETERNAL TOUCH

Making of a devi

Narayan Pal is one of the potters at Kumartuli, Siliguri, West Bengal.

Making of a devi

Anima Roy got inspiration from his husband seven years ago when her husband took her to Kumartuli. She is the only woman potter in this community. Now she and her husband works together to support their growing family.

PAINTING THE FACE

Making of a devi

Tuesday, 17 August 2010 19:33

Cultural Diversity

Written by

India is one of the most religiously diverse countries in the world, with some of the most deeply religious societies and cultures. Religion still plays a central and definitive role in the life of most of its people.

PUJA - I

Cultural Diversity

Some ritual culture at Gangasagar Mela.

PROVAT AROTI (Morning Puja)

Early morning puja at Varanasi on the Ganges.

PUJA -II

Cultural Diversity

DIWALI

Cultural Diversity

Diwali or Deepaawali is one of the most glamorous and important festivals celebrated in India.

IN MEMORY OF FOREFATHERS

Cultural Diversity

He came all the way from Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal, to Varasnasi to bring homage to his deceiced ancesters, like so many Hindu from all over India, believing that after death, the soul given to the Goddes Ganga, remains in the river of life and death.

PUJA III

Cultural Diversity

Ahuti is an oblation or offering. It can also refer to a sacrifice. However, when conducting with a Yagnya it is customary to have a havan or fire sacrifice. The fire is ceremoniously lit, symbolic of inviting Agni the fire God and the mantras are chanted an offering of ghee or havan samagri (a mixture of herbs, flower and ghee) is offered to the fire at the end of the mantra.

I saw this woman giving YAGNYAHUTI in Gangasagar Mela in Sagar Dwip, West Bengal. Instead of havan samagri she was throwing those cotton balls with ghee from that container.

SONDHA AROTI ( Evening Puja)

Cultural DIversity

Evening Puja at Varanasi on the Ganges.

Friday, 30 July 2010 19:51

Portrait

Written by

Portrait

YOUNG SADHU

Gangasagar Mela, West Bengal.

Portrait

OLD WOMAN

In a local market at Darjeeling District, West Bengal.

Portrait

TANTRIK

Charak festival at Siliguri, West Bengal.

Portrait

MOTHER

Gangasagar Mela, West Bengal.

Portrait

A TALK FROM HEART TO HEART

We had a warmhearted talk for one hour and then he blessed me …
A monk in Rumtek Monastery.

Portrait

PANDIT

A Pandit (Priest) from Maharashtra to Gangasagar Mela, West Bengal.

Portrait

I’m not your mother !

A old woman in Gangasagar Mela, West Bengal.

Thursday, 29 July 2010 20:11

About Me

Written by

Apratim Saha

I’ve started photography at age of twelve from inspired by my father. Travelling the world as a photographer for National Geographic Magazine was the dream from my childhood. I have more than 30 years of experience, from traditional film to digital photography. 

I am a commercial photographer specializing in people photography, portraiture, lifestyle & editorial clients. Besides commercial works, I also shoot weddings, family portraits, and other subjects that stimulate my visual or emotional sensibilities. I am a member of National Geographic Stock Photography and Getty Images and Stocksy United. I am also a Brand Ambassador and Mentor for Tamron and Data Color


Anyone who wants to publish or use the images for any purposes please mail me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call +91 8900702900, +91 8509333385, +91 9434249048